John Bogie to be inducted into Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame in 2018!

Members of Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame are selected for their contributions to Canada’s development through their integral roles in the nation’s aviation history. The inductees in 2018 will join the ranks of the 228 esteemed men and women inducted since the Hall’s formation in 1973, bringing to 232 the total number of individual Members of the Hall. For more on the CAHF and the men and women who are members already, check out www.cahf.ca.

“In 2018 we will again be honouring four Canadians for their outstanding places in Canadian aviation,” says Hall of Fame board chairman, Rod Sheridan. “Their careers over several decades span a wide breadth of both military and civilian aviation. They have contributed to the building of airlines and aviation organizations, leadership in the air force, management of industry, development of aviation systems and establishment of air rescue services.”
Plans for the annual gala dinner event and induction ceremonies are well underway. “We expect another complete sell-out for the celebration in Calgary,” says Rod Sheridan, “and I encourage early purchase of tickets for this premiere celebration of Canadian aviation development.”
The four individuals to be installed as Members of the Hall in 2018 are:

  • Gen Paul D. Manson, O.C., CMM, CD
  • Dr. John M. Maris
  • Dr. Dwight Gregory Powell, O.C.

And, of course…
Mr. John M. Bogie
Born into an aviation family in the United States, John Bogie has made his home in Canada since the early 1950s, following service in the United States Navy, work as an airport operator, and as a very young charter pilot. In Canada, he quickly made a name for his charter and resource exploration work for Laurentian Air Services and Spartan Air Services, including the flight that identified the major iron deposit at Gagnon, Quebec.
Complementing his civilian flying, in 1952 Bogie became, with Margaret Carson, a co-founder of the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association (COPA), serving as its first President and Chairman. Since that time, he has been an unswerving supporter of COPA, seeing it grow from modest beginnings to some 17,000 members.
He served in most of COPA’s executive capacities and continues as an honorary director and life member. He still attends as many COPA events as he can, now into his 90s. His COPA accomplishments include simplified medicals for pilots and aviation liability group insurance now used by commercial carriers.
John helped to create the Experimental Aircraft Association Canada organization, as well as a civilian pilot group for Search and Rescue as an adjunct to the military. Another entity he helped bring into being was the Canadian Business Aircraft Association (CBAA), first as an arm of COPA and then as a distinct entity. His Laurentian Air Services career ultimately took him to the presidency, to many initiatives to diversify its operations and to embrace the bilingual nature of the environment in which his company operated.
A subsequent stroke of initiative allowed him to buy a large consignment of ex-US Army Beavers which were rebuilt and put onto the Canadian market. This constituted the largest single aircraft purchase of its kind in Canada and made Laurentian the Canadian centre for Beaver activity. John Bogie has continued to support Canadian aviation long after his retirement in 1992. He continues to enjoy the respect and affection of the aviation community to this day.

 

 

If you’d like to learn more about John Bogie, Laurentian Air Services, and bush flying, check out my book, For the Love of Flying!

 

 

Rod Digney remembers Laurentian Air Services

Rod Digney’s Monday Memories #78

For many years, the north field at Hunt Club and what is now Paul Benoit Driveway was the home base of Canadian aviation pioneer Laurentian Air Services. The founders of LAS began operating at the Hunt Club Field in 1919, incorporated in 1936 and actually owned the entire airport for several months in 1937-38. From the beginning of my time in Ottawa in 1966, the LAS property was a beehive of aviation activity as the company serviced the many bush and survey aircraft flown by it and its subsidiary companies. There were few fences and one had only to ask permission from any of the friendly managers or maintenance personnel to be able to virtually wander and take photographs at will. LAS ceased operations in the late 1990s and today, the only trace of LAS is the iconic metal hangar that formed the background of many a photo and is today part of the Iogen complex.

 

The Laurentian Air Service (LAS) property at the north field always hosted at least one of the company’s Beaver and Otter aircraft. Nov 1972.

 

 

 

 

LAS Cessna 180J C-GCAH in front of the iconic LAS hangar. Oct 1974.

 

 

 

The back yard at LAS was always a treasure chest of aircraft parts, floats, skis, you name it. DHC-3 Otter CF-APQ (c/n 201), acquired earlier from Norwegian carrier Wideroe, is seen awaiting repairs at YOW in Oct 1974 following a crash in Newfoundland a few months earlier.

 

LAS bought, sold and maintained numerous examples of the rugged de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver, including many surplus US Army aircraft. Beaver C-GUJV (c/n 1643) is still flying on the west coast today. 3 Nov 1978.

 

Laurentian’s famous Grumman G-21A Goose CF-BXR hauled VIPs and wealthy fishermen to remote camps from Ottawa and other points for many years. It had previously served the US military and the RCAF during WW II. July 1970.

 

 

A rather worn looking DHC-2 Beaver, CF-HOE (c/n 630) in one of LAS’s standard liveries is seen at YOW 31 Aug 1979. Shortly afterwards, it was sold to a Swedish operator as SE-GXX.

 

 

The only reminder of Laurentian Air Services at YOW’s north field today is the rebuilt hangar that is now part of the Iogen complex as seen from Avro Jetliner Private.

Canada’s History Takes Centre Stage in Ottawa-Gatineau


I’m just back from a whirlwind trip to Ottawa-Gatineau where I got to emcee the 10th annual Canada’s History Forum and gala. They were held at the Canadian Museum of History on the Quebec side, and it was a stimulating and inspiring series of events. At the heart of it all, I felt, were discussions about collaboration, respect and relationships.

If you’d like to learn more about the programme, speakers, projects and see recordings, please visit: http://www.canadashistory.ca/

Thankful that Canada’s History purchased 15 copies of In This Together, the collection of essays I edited last year, to give to speakers as gifts. Also incredibly grateful to have met Elder Claudette Commanda of the Kitigan Zibi Nation, who welcomed us to the Algonquin territory.

 

The theme was “Making History Relevant”, and the practical applications in government departments, classrooms, and in broader society. Perhaps nowhere is history more relevant than reconciliation and social justice, so it should come as no surprise that many of the topics focused on community projects involving First Nations and Metis partners/leaders – as well as the troubling situation in Poland about the history of the Holocaust, and the chilling effect legislation is having on free speech and scholarly investigations.

The following day at Rideau Hall, the newish Governor General, Julie Payette gave a rousing talk in English, French, and a bit of Anishnaabewomin about the importance of evidence-based history. I think we were all ready to follow her into orbit (and yes, there were at least three witty ‘space jokes’ during acceptance speeches).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was particularly pleased to learn about the Indigenous Arts and Stories winners, as well as the awards that went to Dr. Sarah Carter (whose book on captivity narratives blew me away in undergrad) and Daniel Francis, a popularizer of history whose book Imaginary Indians was seminal for my understanding of stereotyping and how we construct identity. These are two of the titles who helped push me toward cultural and social history!

I can’t wait to be a speaker at the National Council for Public History’s conference in Las Vegas in April, and keep connecting with folks who are digging deep into our past – and investigating how we remember. Maybe I’ll see you there!


GG02-2017-0417-065 November 22, 2017 Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette, Governor General of Canada, presented teachers and other outstanding Canadians with the 2017 Governor General’s History Awards for their efforts to further an interest in and understanding of Canadian history and heritage. The awards was presented at a ceremony at Rideau Hall, on Wednesday, November 22, 2017. Credit: MCpl Vincent Carbonneau, Rideau Hall, OSGG

 

 

Review of Haunted Hospitals

Mark Leslie and Rhonda Parrish, Haunted Hospitals: Eerie Tales about Hospitals, Sanatoriums, and Other Institutions (Dundurn, 2017), 220 pages.

 

When Rhonda Parrish moved in next to the Charles Camsell Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta – reputed to be the most haunted building in the city – the seeds were sown for this book. From there, it took just a brief conversation between Parrish and Mark Leslie, author of Creepy Capital and Tomes of Terror, for the two writers to team up on Haunted Hospitals: Eerie Tales about Hospitals, Sanatoriums, and Other Institutions.

As Parrish notes in her introduction, “Day after day the most extreme of human experiences play out within the walls of hospitals. The most intense emotions are experienced again and again. Birth. Death. Trauma. Suffering.” It’s little wonder, then, that so many stories of paranormal happenings are tied to these institutions.

This nonfiction book is a compendium of stories drawn from interviews, forum and website posts, books of ghost stories, and videos from shows like Ghost Hunters. It is clear that Parrish and Leslie (both curious skeptics) cast their net wide and did a lot of research to bring some of the most notable and chilling tales from haunted hospitals, asylums, as well as prisons that housed the criminally insane.

These stories span two hundred years and come from Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Singapore and Italy, and in many ways feel like a ghost tour you might take on vacation or in your own city around Halloween. Some tales are quite involved and Parrish’s talents as a speculative fiction writer are on full display. You can imagine strolling through the streets of Montreal to the student residence repurposed from a hospital/orphanage where over fifty children burned to death in 1918. You can picture navigating mazes of tunnels beneath sprawling institutions, past the body chutes and the basement rooms where especially unruly patients might be shackled in earlier times. Other entries are more like quick stops along the way, a short blurb in a haunted guidebook (this is especially the case with the ‘Prisons’ section at the end of the book).

As with ghost tours, Haunted Hospitals, is also a great ‘gateway drug’ for those of us interested in history, medical ethics, and how societies have viewed and treated physical and mental illness. It offers good historical context and facts about the buildings as well, and touches on controversies around redevelopment, urban planning, and whether people should use these institutions for haunted tours and other ‘terror lite’ experiences.

Parrish and Leslie challenge us to imagine what it’s like for cities and institutions overwhelmed by tuberculosis, Spanish Flu and the plague to deal in a humane manner with patients. And while they dedicate the book to medical professionals who devote their lives to healing, they face issues of overcrowding, neglect, and patient abuse head on, as well as allegations of medical research and experimentation.

There were two stories, however, where more digging and contextualization (and a bit less sensationalism) was needed. First, the tale of ‘Nurse Emmie’ at Rolling Hills Asylum, a purported member of a ‘satanic coven’, seems to lean heavily on the 1990s-era hysteria over satanic cults that proved to be mostly unfounded. Second, the transcribed 1935 news story of Dr. H.E. Zimmerly in Pennsylvania is problematic. If you have some background on the history of women’s reproductive health, it sounds very much like he was simply performing abortions – illegal at the time – for poor young women with nowhere safer to turn. These were terrifying, of course, but in a different way than the story might have intended.

Like haunted tours of these hospitals and the communities that surround them, it’s tricky to balance the entertainment factor of creepy stories with the history and deeper meanings within them. Generally, Parrish and Leslie do a good job walking this line, giving us the chills we crave while educating us about changing ideas of medical care, criminalization, and mental illness.

This is a fun and thoughtful book, and anyone interested in medicine mixed with the paranormal will find stories to stimulate the imagination – and give you goosebumps.

 

If you’d like to go deeper into the subject of haunted buildings in the United States, and get a bit more of an academic bent on the topic, I recommend you check out Ghostland: An American History in Haunted Places by Colin Dickey.

Want to know more about the complex history and legacy of the Charles Camsell Hospital? Please visit www.ghostsofcamsell.ca, my blog on the topic.

Harvey the Cat at Sienna Library on Oct 29!

In honour of National Cat Day, the Sienna Branch Library in Missouri City, TX is hosting two hours of kitty purrfection on Sunday, October 29. From 2-4 p.m., come out to make DIY cat toys, cat treat recipes, see adorable cats up for adoption, watch funny cat videos, and get transformed by the talented Catherine Gauche Visagie of Sienna Plantation Face Painting.

I’ll be reading  Harvey the Cat at 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. So bring your stuffed animal cats and kittens to snuggle while I tell you this amazing, ‘nearly true’ story!

If you live on the south side of Houston and are bummed you missed my event at Blue Willow Bookshop, I hope you can come join us!

For more details, directions, etc, please follow this link to the library’s site.

 

Harvey the Cat: A Nearly True Story of Hurricane Harvey and the Houston Floods

When life throws overwhelming experiences at me, I write about them. That’s just what I (and most of the other writers I know) do in order to process and make sense of things. So when I recently went through Hurricane Harvey with my family and pets, I started writing.

 

 

 

First it was just a few notes and impressions, getting down the images seared into my mind from the media and our own lived experiences. I made notes of the things my five-year-old son asked us about or said (he’s highly quotable). How our cat, Guinness, acted as we hunkered down, packed up, and fled. What we did each step of the way through the storm leading up to our mandatory evacuation. [Read more about that on my e-newsletter]

I also made notes on a Twitter post about “Harvey the Cat” (real name Bailey) who ended up at the Fort Bend Office of Emergency Management, and then was reunited with his family a couple of days later through the power of social media. And, like everyone else, I saw the epic photo of “Angry Cat Swimming” as it inspired the internet to write memes (the internet sure loves cats!).

 

 

All of these true stories combined into one “nearly true” story of Harvey the Cat, and I’m so excited to share it with the world to help families with their own processing and rebuilding. We managed to make it out safely, came home to a mostly intact home and neighborhood, and now we’re trying help those who weren’t so lucky.

 

Harvey the Cat will make his first appearance at a live storytelling event at Houston’s Blue Willow Bookshop on Saturday, September 23 @ 11 a.m. It’s free and for all ages.

UPDATE: the very talented Catherine Visagie Gauthier is donating her time to transform your kids into kitties for this event through face painting. If you have cat ears or tails at home from costumes, why not bring them too!

Like the storm, this event is evolving constantly, so I’ll post new details as they come up here and on the Facebook event page. The Houston Chronicle is our media partner on this project and will be recording the event and hopefully creating a digital version that we can share widely soon.

I’m waiving my usual speaking fees with this story and ask that you donate instead to Blue Willow’s Hurricane Harvey Book Drive or one of the other organizations listed on their site.


If you want to organize a book/donation drive event in your community (or through your school, church or library), please get in touch and I’ll try my best to accommodate as many requests in the coming weeks as possible! Click here to go to my Contact page. You can also find me on Twitter (@Danielle_Author) and Facebook under my full name.

Sneak peek at the story!

Harvey the Cat: A Nearly True Story of Hurricane Harvey and the Houston Floods

Dedicated to Zen the cat, Alonso Guillen, Sgt. Steve Perez and other Harvey heroes

“There’s a bad storm coming, Devon,” Mama said one morning, “we need to get ready.”

“A tsunami wave?” (I just learned about those).

She smiled, but her mouth was tight. “A hurricane. But it’ll just feel like a really long rainstorm here. We’ll watch movies, play games, and have special snacks.”

“Do I have to go to school?”

She shook her head. I didn’t really know what a hurricane was, but it sounded kind of like a vacation. Bayou, our cat, sat and watched us with his big green-golden eyes.

Q&A with Shawn Selway for Hamilton Review of Books

I really enjoyed getting the chance to chat with Shawn Selway, author of the recent book, Nobody Here Will Harm You, about the Tuberculosis evacuations of Inuit from the Eastern Arctic.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read our full conversation over at the Hamilton Review of Books website!

Airforce Magazine “highly recommends” Polar Winds!

A lot of the podcasts and interviews I’ve listened to about writing lately have centred on the idea of a book lasting for ten years. The question to ask yourself when you embark on a book project is: ten years after it’s been published, will it still be read and be relevant? I always aspire to this, so it’s highly gratifying when – three years after Polar Winds appeared – I received this lovely review in Airforce Magazine by Dr. Richard Goette, a historian and Associate Editor-in-Chief of the publication. I know Richard through the aviation history community and I know how rigorous he is in his own research, so this means even more coming from someone I respect and admire.

“Polar Winds is an excellent synthesis of various stories, accounts, and themes regarding aviation in Canada’s North during the 20th century….Metcalfe-Chenail writes with clarity, refinement, and also with a hint of humour.”

*Apologies for the slightly blurry first image. Tried re-scanning ten times and it just didn’t want to work!

 

RISE Book Club Reading Guide – In This Together

It’s been a year since In This Together: Fifteen Stories of Truth and Reconciliation came out, but the conversations we wanted to highlight with our essays are still relevant and ongoing.

That’s why I’m so excited that RISE-Reconciliation in Solidarity Edmonton (which, full disclosure, I mention in my intro) has selected In This Together as its third book in its book club. If you live in Edmonton, I hope you will join us for an in-person discussion Thursday, June 1 from 4:30-6pm at the City Hall School (in City Hall). You can find all the details here.

If you’re not in Edmonton, or you can’t make it out that day, we – all us contributors and RISE – invite you to consider the following questions. You can always contact us through the Twitter handles you see in the Bios section at the back of the book, or leave a comment below, with your thoughts and questions.

I hope you’ll use these questions for your own book club discussions wherever you happen to be. Maybe you’ll even set up a reconciliation book club like RISE did. If you do, please let me know about it!

 

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Here are some general questions about the book and reconciliation:

What impact has this book had on you? What have you learned? What sticks out for you from the reading?

What kinds of conversations have you had about this book?

Can you share your own “aha” or “lightbulb” moment, where you realized something important about our country’s colonial past?

What does it mean to say that we’re “In this Together”? What could your role be in moving towards reconciliation?

What are some of the ways we can move beyond words (apologies, reports, etc) and take action towards reconciliation?

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Here are some more specific questions the contributors brainstormed:

Week 1 –  pages 1-66 Intro + essays by Baker, Streetly, Luckert, Kane, and Todd

  1. Has there been a moment, an event, or an experience in your life when you came face to face with your own assumptions and biases about Indigenous peoples. How did that realization change you?
  2. Joanna’s essay suggests that personal connections are the strongest and most lasting steps towards reconciliation. What is more effective in creating change:  grassroots movements or government policies? Why?
  3. In Erika’s essay, she considers a historical act of mapping – that of Treaty 6 —its implications, and the ways it might be unwritten or rewritten. But this is just one map of one place, and there are many others. Think about the maps that shape your understanding of where you live. What are they? Who made them? What vision of the land do they create? What do they reveal, and what do they conceal? If you were to remap your home, what might you show that isn’t seen in the maps you already know?

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Week 2 – pages 67-132 essays by Kunuk, Cooper+Campbell, Edwards, Shaben, Palmer Gordon, and Kronyk

  1. Carol’s essay explored her assumptions and missed opportunities for deep connections with Echo and Rose. What can you do to foster real and meaningful friendships with Indigenous individuals you count among your circle of friends? How can you confide in, learn from, and work sympathetically with them to bridge the gulf of misinformation, misunderstanding, assumption and inequity that exists in Canada today?
  2. Rhonda’s essay argues we need to acknowledge the past so that we can deal with it in a just manner. Yet, as people like Senator Beyak and J.L Granatstein show, many Canadians aren’t willing to truthfully acknowledge our past. Senator Sinclair has said that we can’t get to reconciliation until we get to the truth. Do readers see people in their communities pursuing truth? What are some ways we can help Canadians understand and acknowledge the truth about our past relationship with Indigenous peoples?

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Week 3 – pages 133-208 essays by Larocque, Neilsen Glenn, Halton, and Mountain + conversation between Shelagh Rogers and Senator Murray Sinclair

  1. Emma’s essay centres on justice. What does justice mean or look like for Indigenous peoples?
  2. As a reader, did you experience empathy when reading any of the essays? When?
  3. Is it easier to reach across gaps between us when we think of reconciliation in terms of the individual rather than from a societal perspective? We must as a society address reconciliation but that can be overwhelming for Joe or Jane Canadian – what ways and means are there for us to hold our hands out to one person, or two or three at a time, that are more within our reach?
  4. What holds you (or people you know) back from talking about these issues? Are they afraid what they say will be controversial? Are they not ready to accept or reconcile?
  5. What do we need to do next?

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Two Upcoming Camsell Hospital Events in Edmonton

 
As part of the upcoming Reconciliation Week and in support of ongoing truth and reconciliation work in our city, RISE is please to be hosting two upcoming events related to the history and memory of the Charles Camsell Hospital. Both events are free and everyone is welcome. Donations will be accepted at the door and online to make the events possible.
Connecting to Camsell – Screening & Discussion
Tuesday, May 30 from 6-8PM at the River Cree Resort & Casino
What do you know about the Charles Camsell Hospital?
Learn more about the layered history from a segregated Indian hospital to a present-day housing development through a series of short films and a panel discussion.
Featuring:
“The Longer Trail” (1956, National Film Board of Canada)
“Lost Songs” (1999, National Film Board of Canada)
“Camsell” (2016, Edmonton Heritage Council)
The screenings will be followed by a panel discussion including former patients, local researchers and community members.Free event, everyone welcome. Please RSVP.
Donations gladly accepted at the door.
Sponsored by: Enoch Cree Nation Archives, River Cree Resort & Casino, City of Edmonton, and Edmonton Heritage Council.
 
 
Connecting to Camsell – Story Collection
Thursday, June 8 from 11AM-4PM at Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church, Enoch Cree Nation
 
What do you remember about the Charles Camsell Hospital?
Come to a safe community space to share your experiences, recollections, photographs, documents, and art and craft items from the Camsell Hospital.
Members of RISE and staff from the Enoch Cree Nation Archives will help collect information to catalogue for the archives so that others can learn about this important past.
 
Lunch and other refreshments served.
Free drop-in event, everyone welcome.
Donations gladly accepted at the door.
Sponsored by: Enoch Cree Nation Archives, City of Edmonton, and Edmonton Heritage Council.
 
RISE – Reconciliation in Solidarity Edmonton
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© 2011 Danielle Metcalfe-Chenail. All Rights Reserved.