One young reader’s thoughts on In This Together

I read In This Together, and wow. There were stories in there that I connected with emotionally, stories in there where I could relate to what the author was saying, and stories that made me question myself. All the stories made me think. Thank you for this book. I honestly believe that it needs to be read by all High School and University students.

Also, thank you for including the contact information for the contributors to the book. I’m in the process of contacting them just to thank them, and for a few, to ask questions. ~Salman Ahmed, college student in Edmonton, Alberta

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Liz Muir launches new books about Canadian aviation for kids this month!

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The Charles Camsell Indian Hospital: From Haunting to Understanding

I was walking around my new neighbourhood here in Houston, Texas, and all the pumpkins, witches and ghosts decorating homes got me thinking about the Charles Camsell Hospital and how far we’ve come.

In 2014, when I first started researching the Camsell in earnest, most news stories and internet hits talked about its status as a haunted building. There were “Top 10 Edmonton Haunted Sites” lists and shivery stories about breaking in after dark. But, as I’ve been learning, urban legends keep knowledge shallow. They keep us from looking into the complex nature of places and experiences, and the roles we play in them.

To read the full post on my Ghosts of Camsell site, please go to http://wp.me/p5S7BR-5n

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A Celebration and Transformation

p1040234When I decided to throw a party to launch my new book in the US, I wondered the best way to do it. While traditional book launches are lovely, this book has been all about creating community, having tricky discussions, and seeing each other through new eyes. I wanted my young son to be able to enjoy the party. I wanted my new friends here in the Houston area to gather, bring their families, and meet each other.

p1040255So I threw a ‘book birthday party’ that Namita Asthana at Off the Vine Bistro generously offered to host. About thirty of us got together to drink her delicious pumpkin-spice punch, eat her home-made French macarons, and chat while the kids drew on poster board with crayons and glitter paint what it looks like to work together and to listen. My new friend, Catherine, of Sienna Plantation Face Painting, brought her kit and her creativity to show us how we can all make small steps to transform ourselves.

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The kids are already ahead of us on this. The ones who came were mostly in the four to six year old range, and have pretty good ideas about what’s fair and what’s not in the world. But they’re still elastic enough in their thinking to adopt new ways of doing things if the old ones aren’t working. They’re able to ask tough questions because they really want to know – they’re just so curious. They don’t realize adults might find the questions awkward or embarrassing (albeit necessary). They know they can expand their experiences by pretending to be a rainbow leopard or Spiderman, or anyone or anything else.

Wouldn’t it be great if we adults were that playful and open? Willing to walk in the shoes of someone else?

p1040269That’s the heart of this book. To see through someone else’s eyes, walk in their shoes, and imagine what life might be like if you were born in a different time, place and body.

 

p1040246Thanks to everyone who came from the Houston Writer’s Guild and the local chapter of the Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. And thanks to my amazing husband and son who have supported me in this work and celebrated along side of me.

If you live in the Houston area and would like to buy a copy of the book, please contact Brazos Bookstore or your local Barnes & Noble. Hopefully they’ll have some in stock soon, or can easily order them in. And, of course, you can get them through your favourite online retailer. You can also request that your local library bring in a copy. All you’ll need is the basic book information found by clicking here.

p1040268And if you belong to a book club, church group, school or conversation circle and you’d like to buy copies for your members and have me come and speak, please get in touch through this website. I’ll help you figure out how we can make that happen!

 

 

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ROSELLA BJORNSON: CELEBRATING WOMEN OF AVIATION

Rosella Bjornson is Canada’s first woman commercial airline jet aircraft pilot and Canada’s first woman airline captain.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2016
1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Alberta Aviation Museum, 11410 Kingsway Avenue, Edmonton

Rosella Bjornson makes history by becoming Canada’s first woman airline jet aircraft pilot – April 1973.
The Alberta Labour History Institute (ALHI), the Alberta Aviation Museum, and Elevate Aviation (an organization to promote women in aviation) invite you to come to learn about and celebrate the historic achievements of Capt. Rosella Bjornson and her contributions to the advancement of women in aviation. Capt. Bjornson is Canada’s first woman commercial airline jet aircraft pilot and first woman airline captain. She is also the first woman member of the Canadian Air Line Pilots Association (CALPA). She was inducted into Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame. Originally from southern Alberta, she now lives in the Edmonton area.
At the November 5 celebration, the Alberta Labour History Institute will be presenting excerpts from its new videos featuring Capt. Bjornson and her historic achievements and contributions.
Admission to the event is free. Please let us know by e-mail if you are planning to attend. The ALHI e-mail is office@albertalabourhistory.org.
ALHI’s project Moving Forward: Alberta Women and Work is generously supported by the Edmonton Heritage Council and the Alberta Historical Resources Foundation.

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© 2011 Danielle Metcalfe-Chenail. All Rights Reserved.